Global Team of 200



Global Team of 200 is a highly specialized group of members of Mom Bloggers for Social Good that concentrates on issues involving women and girls, children, world hunger and maternal health.


Our Motto: Individually we are all powerful. Together we can change the world. We believe in the power of collective action to help others and believe in ourselves to make this world a better place for our children and the world’s children.






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Posts tagged "Jennifer Barbour"

For the past few days, I have been traveling in the Caribbean side of Nicaragua with WaterAid America. They work in some of the most remote areas of the region to bring better access to water and sanitation.
Since being here, I’ve been amazed at the high level of poverty and near absence of running water all around me. I found out that less than 20% of people in this area have access to basic water and sanitation. We have seen some taps in the urban area of Bilwi that are connected to the municipal supply that are completely dry. I’m told they only get water every two or three days. (via Philanthropy Friday: Generosity Has No Language Barrier)

Since being here, I’ve been amazed at the high level of poverty and near absence of running water all around me. I found out that less than 20% of people in this area have access to basic water and sanitation. We have seen some taps in the urban area of Bilwi that are connected to the municipal supply that are completely dry. I’m told they only get water every two or three days. (via Philanthropy Friday: Generosity Has No Language Barrier)

I encourage you to take some time and read through the letter from Bill and Melinda Gates. While I pulled out some of the highlights, there is much more information included in the letter, and it may will open your eyes to several global issues. It’s a great read. (via Bill and Melinda Gates: Debunking Myths Around Global Poverty - another jennifer)

The first people I met at BlogHer ’13 – besides my fabulous roommate, Nicole Melancon of ThirdEyeMom – were Phil and Tanya from Save the Children. They just happened to be heading out of the hotel in search for food at the same time as Nicole and me. We chit chatted in the lobby a bit and ended up going out to dinner together. The next night we met again for dinner, this time for a more formal presentation on Save the Children’s work both in the US and internationally. I was elated to meet some of my fellow Global Team of 200 members at this intimate dinner. (via Saving the Children - another jennifer)

On August 1, I had the opportunity to attend a webinar hosted by the US Fund for UNICEF. The topic of the webinar was the state of the world’s children with disabilities. While the issue of disability is not a new one for UNICEF, I learned that they are moving from focusing on the protection of children with disabilities to promoting their rights the same as other children. I left for my vacation shortly after the webinar and didn’t get the chance to write about it. It’s been popping into my head ever since, so I thought I would share some of what I learned. (via Child Before Disability - another jennifer)

Unfortunately, for 28 states in the US, the answer to the question in the title of this post is “No.” Save the Children launched a report last week that shows how prepared each state is (or isn’t) if a natural or other disaster happened. As part of its Get Ready. Get Safe campaign, Save the Children’s report is a state-by-state assessment of U.S. preparation and safety standards for children in child care facilities and in schools. This is the sixth year the organization has released a preparedness report. While progress has been made, more than half of the states still fall short on preparedness. (via Is Your State Prepared to Save the Children in a Disaster? - another jennifer)

My kids go back to school next week. G will start 3rd grade and Biz will begin his second year of preschool. After I pick them up from daycare today, I will take them out to go school shopping. We have a school supply list for G, and I’ll probably buy them an outfit for the first day of class. Back to school shopping isn’t a big deal in my house. The boys grow so fast, it just doesn’t make sense to buy clothes for an entire school year in one trip. I get them what they need throughout the year. It’s simple really. My son goes to public school, so the only thing I have to pay for is an occasional hot lunch. While I pay for Biz’s preschool, it is part of the daycare fee I already pay. I take for granted how easy back to school is for my family. (via Investing in Education, One Child at a Time - another jennifer)

My sons actually have quite a fascination with the island country due to its unique wildlife, much of which is endemic to the region. My youngest could point out Madagascar on a world map when he was three. I’ll be honest when I say I’ve never thought much about the people who actually live on the island of Madagascar. Or the kids. Where there are communities of people, there are kids who go to school. Madagascar is no different. (via Building Futures in Madagascar with Wateraid America - another jennifer)

I knew the importance of nutrition in those early stages of childhood, even before my kids were born. What I didn’t realize is that if a child isn’t given the proper nutrition in the first 1,000 days of life, from pregnancy to age 2, his growth could be stunted and his performance in school could be affected. To think that pregnant women and children are lucky to even have a daily meal, let alone a nutritious one, never even crossed my mind when I was pregnant. I was lucky to have the means to eat a healthy diet and access to the food my body needed. I’m much more aware of what it means to be food insecure these days. My nonprofit work in Maine has opened my eyes to child poverty that I didn’t know existed in my own back yard. Nearly 1 in 4 children in Maine are food insecure.

The problem in Madagascar is that toilets and access to water taps are severely lacking. Unfortunately, 13,000 children under five die due to water-related diseases in Madagascar. (Source: Wateraid) In Madagascar, 79% of schools don’t have clean water, and 41% of schools don’t even have a toilet. Can you imagine having to go to the bathroom out in the open as a school kid? (via Building Futures in Madagascar with Wateraid America - another jennifer)

According to Save the Children’s new report, good nutrition can help kids learn and even earn more money when they grow up. That’s in addition to growing up healthy and strong, of course. But we’ve got to nourish our children first. (via Philanthropy Friday: Food For Thought on Global Nutrition - another jennifer)