Global Team of 200



Global Team of 200 is a highly specialized group of members of Mom Bloggers for Social Good that concentrates on issues involving women and girls, children, world hunger and maternal health.


Our Motto: Individually we are all powerful. Together we can change the world. We believe in the power of collective action to help others and believe in ourselves to make this world a better place for our children and the world’s children.






Recent Tweets @

My #waterstory acknowledges that I have always had it. I live near the shore of a fresh water lake. I also have the proximity of its beauty. The waves touch the shore, I am renewed. I have it. 768 million others do not. That matters. (via World Water Day March 22! | About Proximity)

For the past few days, I have been traveling in the Caribbean side of Nicaragua with WaterAid America. They work in some of the most remote areas of the region to bring better access to water and sanitation.
Since being here, I’ve been amazed at the high level of poverty and near absence of running water all around me. I found out that less than 20% of people in this area have access to basic water and sanitation. We have seen some taps in the urban area of Bilwi that are connected to the municipal supply that are completely dry. I’m told they only get water every two or three days. (via Philanthropy Friday: Generosity Has No Language Barrier)

Since being here, I’ve been amazed at the high level of poverty and near absence of running water all around me. I found out that less than 20% of people in this area have access to basic water and sanitation. We have seen some taps in the urban area of Bilwi that are connected to the municipal supply that are completely dry. I’m told they only get water every two or three days. (via Philanthropy Friday: Generosity Has No Language Barrier)

My #waterstory acknowledges that I have always had it. I live near the shore of a fresh water lake. I also have the proximity of its beauty. The waves touch the shore, I am renewed. I have it. 768 million others do not. That matters. (via World Water Day March 22! | About Proximity)

WaterAid America wants you to share your Water Story – a time when you did not have access to water, or a clean bathroom. Did it happen during a natural disaster, such as a tornado, earthquake, or hurricane? When I was a child, a water main broke near my home. Besides no drinking water, we could not use the toilet or take showers. There were no bottled water back then. And using the toilet was an experience unto itself. Thank goodness my parents took care of that. Within a few days, they sent us off to family so we didn’t have to go through this disgusting and unsafe situation.
But for those in developing nations, this is what they go through every day. They can get water, but it is a feat. And mostly women and girls are the one who gather water in large, heavy containers. (via World Water Day 2014 - BrainFoggles)

WaterAid is proving that even the impossible can be won. Because of donor
support from people who won’t take poverty for an answer, WaterAid has been able
to help over 19 million people gain access to safe water since 1981, and reached
15.1 million people with toilets and sanitation since 2004. That’s millions of stories
of how individual lives have been transformed in some of the world’s poorest,
hardest to reach places. (via Sharing My #waterstory for World Water Day | Window on the World)

Water is just the beginning of the road out of poverty. WaterAid helps the world’s poorest people to plan, build and manage their own safe water supplies and to improve their sanitation and hygiene. These basic services transform lives. Hours spent carrying water can instead be spent with family, tending crops, raising livestock or starting a business. Simple changes to sanitation and hygiene practices save thousands of babies’ lives and keep children in school. (via World Water Day, You and WaterAid America | climatemama.com)

March 22 is World Water Day, a day for all of us to raise our voices, cameras, pens and pennies on behalf of the 768 million people around the world that live without safe water to drink. (via Biz Mommy L.A.)

It pains my heart to see a pregnant woman walk into a health facility and leave without her baby. It greatly saddens me. Especially when I learn that the death could have been avoided. I mourn for the baby that never made it out of the hospital, or even the one that never made it to the hospital in the first place. I cry for the baby who got an infection when she was being delivered at home, or in a facility that was not adequately equipped. I cry for the mother who lost her baby in a case of negligence at a health facility. I read of this cases all the time -in the newspapers and on television. As a journalist, I sometimes publish these stories. (via Mummy Tales Why Newborn Health Matters to Me)

Save the Children recently released a brand-new report about newborn survival: Ending Newborn Deaths: Ensuring Every Baby Survives. 2.9 million babies die every year around the world from health complications that are wholly preventable like preterm complications and sepsis. Even though that number has been halved since 1990, the number of newborn deaths is still drastically high. Of those 2.9 million babies who die each year, 1 million of them die within the first 24 hours of life. (via Moms Reflect on Global Newborn Health and Survival)

Obviously, this is an important topic to me. I lost a two day old infant and have been championing for Newborn Health ever since. I often blog about this topic, most recently about the Newborn Health Action Plan. So when Social Good Moms sent out information about raising awareness to help end newborn death, it was not even a question that I would participate.