Global Team of 200



Global Team of 200 is a highly specialized group of members of Mom Bloggers for Social Good that concentrates on issues involving women and girls, children, world hunger and maternal health.


Our Motto: Individually we are all powerful. Together we can change the world. We believe in the power of collective action to help others and believe in ourselves to make this world a better place for our children and the world’s children.






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Malaria Research

Ndola, Zambia

Photos: Jennifer James

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Motherhood in Tanzania and Zambia

Photos: Jennifer James

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Slideshow: Motherhood around the world: Kenya, Tanzania, India, Ethiopia, and Zambia. 

Photos: Jennifer James

(via socialgoodmoms)

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Expectant Mothers’ Group
South Delhi
Okhla Slum 

May 2013 
Photos: Jennifer James

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Northern Tanzania in the foothills of Mount Meru, just outside Arusha National Park 
Maasai Mother and Son
September 2013

Photo: Jennifer James

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A health extension worker counting the breaths (respiratory rate) of a newborn. #newbornhealth #Ethiopia #Hawassa - April 2014

Photo: Jennifer James

My #waterstory acknowledges that I have always had it. I live near the shore of a fresh water lake. I also have the proximity of its beauty. The waves touch the shore, I am renewed. I have it. 768 million others do not. That matters. (via World Water Day March 22! | About Proximity)

For the past few days, I have been traveling in the Caribbean side of Nicaragua with WaterAid America. They work in some of the most remote areas of the region to bring better access to water and sanitation.
Since being here, I’ve been amazed at the high level of poverty and near absence of running water all around me. I found out that less than 20% of people in this area have access to basic water and sanitation. We have seen some taps in the urban area of Bilwi that are connected to the municipal supply that are completely dry. I’m told they only get water every two or three days. (via Philanthropy Friday: Generosity Has No Language Barrier)

Since being here, I’ve been amazed at the high level of poverty and near absence of running water all around me. I found out that less than 20% of people in this area have access to basic water and sanitation. We have seen some taps in the urban area of Bilwi that are connected to the municipal supply that are completely dry. I’m told they only get water every two or three days. (via Philanthropy Friday: Generosity Has No Language Barrier)

My #waterstory acknowledges that I have always had it. I live near the shore of a fresh water lake. I also have the proximity of its beauty. The waves touch the shore, I am renewed. I have it. 768 million others do not. That matters. (via World Water Day March 22! | About Proximity)

WaterAid America wants you to share your Water Story – a time when you did not have access to water, or a clean bathroom. Did it happen during a natural disaster, such as a tornado, earthquake, or hurricane? When I was a child, a water main broke near my home. Besides no drinking water, we could not use the toilet or take showers. There were no bottled water back then. And using the toilet was an experience unto itself. Thank goodness my parents took care of that. Within a few days, they sent us off to family so we didn’t have to go through this disgusting and unsafe situation.
But for those in developing nations, this is what they go through every day. They can get water, but it is a feat. And mostly women and girls are the one who gather water in large, heavy containers. (via World Water Day 2014 - BrainFoggles)